Society

Fun Ideas Can Be Costly.

Have you ever been to a concert and imagined yourself being the one performing. Or, being one of the dancers, or musicians? When we fixate on ourselves doing something it’s because in some form or fashion we believe we can actually do it.

I’m not talking about the moments when you see Lebron James dunk on someone and then you think about what if you could dunk. I’m talking about the dreams that occupy your mind for hours, days, weeks.

In 2010 I received a $2,000 refund check from my student loans. I used $500 of that check to buy an electric Fender guitar because during that time I was listening to a lot of rock music and often imagined myself playing the guitar myself. I had hopes of joining a band, or making YouTube videos doing guitar covers of songs I liked.

It’s 2020 and I haven’t taken a single guitar lesson or learned a single song to play. I pretty much wasted $500. I still have the guitar so I can at least make half of my money back. But, the point of this article is to determine why I allowed my thoughts to turn into actions, and go absolutely nowhere with them.

I didn’t have a part time job in college, although I had the time to take guitar lessons, I didn’t have the money. And even if I did have the money, I didn’t have a car, so unless I found someone who lived on campus who could give me lessons, or were willing to pick me up for lessons, I was SOL.

The main reason I allowed my fun thoughts to turn into actions is because I knew had the minimum qualities to make it happen. I didn’t have a logical plan on how to make it happen. I just figured I’d get the equipment and figure it out from there.

So whats required to learn the guitar? Two hands, a guitar, and lessons. I knew I was physically capable to learn the guitar, I was financially able to buy a guitar. And, I figured I could take online lessons so I had a means of learning the guitar.

The reason I never allowed my imaginations of myself dunking is because I knew I couldn’t make it a reality. I’m 5’8. I’m too short to dunk. I knew by the time I was 16 years old that dunking on a basketball goal would never be my reality. I also didn’t have a passion to play basketball. I didn’t play basketball in high school. I had absolutely no possibility of making basketball a reality. Our minds don’t waste too much time on thoughts that are literally impossible.

Fast forward to 2015 I bought an Xbox to keep myself busy in the barracks when I joined the Army. I played games like Advance Warfare, The Elder Scrolls, and The Witcher 3. I watched gaming videos on YouTube when I had questions on how to complete a certain quest or something and I saw that many gamers were making a living from making gaming videos.

I figured that I should give it a try. Why? Because I imagined myself doing it and I knew I could make it a reality. I already had an interest in playing video games, I was financially capable of buying whatever equipment I needed, and I could make time to do it.

I’m 30 years old now and I’m not sure if a gaming/streaming career is something I still want. A gaming career is a grind. Some people are blessed, and their careers took off in a year or so. But, the biggest gaming names like NICKMERS, Dr. Disrespect, Swagg, Nadeshot, Ninja—all had long humble beginnings. They were gaming fanatics before the rise of Twitch, YouTube Gaming, and Mixer.

For example: Swagg has been uploading gaming videos for the past 8 years and although he’s popular and making a pretty good living from gaming, he still isn’t considered a celebrity gamer.

I figured that in 10 years I’ll be 40 years old. Do I really want to play video games for a living at 40? I don’t know. I barely like playing video games for more than an hour now. But, I would like to invest in some form or fashion in the gaming industry whether it’s creating a gaming brand, managing, or just supporting other streamers.

Cameron Armstrong graduated from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga with a B.A. in English: Writing and a minor in Womens Studies. He created ArmstrongTimes to express his opinion on Relationships, Social Issues, and Spirituality.

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